Radiocarbon dating and the shroud of turin

The coining of the word "photography" is usually attributed to Sir John Herschel in 1839.It is based on the Greek φῶς (phōs), (genitive: phōtós) meaning "light", and γραφή (graphê), meaning "drawing, writing", together meaning "drawing with light".The notion that light can affect various substances - for instance the suntanning of skin or fading of textile - must have been around since very early times.

In 1558 Giambattista della Porta advised using the camera obscura as a drawing aid in his popular and influential books.Subsequent innovations made photography easier and more versatile.New materials reduced the required camera exposure time from minutes to seconds, and eventually to a small fraction of a second; new photographic media were more economical, sensitive or convenient, including roll films for casual use by amateurs.The history of photography has roots in remote antiquity with the discovery of two critical principles, that of the camera obscura image projection and the fact that some substances are visibly altered by exposure to light, as discovered by observation.Apart from a very uncertain process used on the Turin Shroud there are no artifacts or descriptions that indicate that anyone even imagined capturing images with light sensitive materials before the 18th century.

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